Photography, Running, and Writing – Artist, CARL SCHARWATH

Photography, Running and Writing with Carl Scharwath

Sick Lit Magazine: What inspires you as an artist?

Carl Scharwath: Other artists. I have a deep love of reading, the arts and discovering new authors and photographers. The biographies of artists are also inportant to learn as they have gone through many of the  same heartbreaks and still  overcame them.

ART_STUDIO

SLM: Tell me a bit about your creative process.

CS: Since I am a dedicated, competitive runner, many of my story and poem ideas give birth on the run. Unfortunately those great sentences are forgotten by the time I arrive home, but the ideas are not. I also run with my cell phone and have captured photos on my run, either by stopping or returning latter. Ideas are all around us, we only have to be receptive.

Blue

SLM: What music are you currently listening to?

CS: I  will always love REM and thier innovation. From my teen years The Beach Boys and Brian Wilson’s solo albums still spark a memory from simple times in my life.

Awaken

SLM: If you could categorize these pieces in a few words, what would they be?

CS: Surealistic, philosophical and thinking how they would look as an oil painting.

Angel of the Antiques

SLM: What are you working on right now?

CS: A new short story, my second chap book and a play. Working full time, having grand children and training as a runner does not leave much time but I try my best on early weekend mornings to dedicate time to my art.

DUMPSTER ART

SLM: Tell me something that not many people know about you.

CS: My daughter and I spend nine years training together and were awarded a 2nd degree Black Belt in Taekwondo

Explorations

SLM: How would one of us, per se, purchase your work?

CS: I have never thought of the process to sell my work. My enjoyment comes from being published, the creative process and working with and meeting editors such as you.

Cyrstal

courtyard

Waiting for a dancewoman reflection

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Carl Scharwath has appeared globally with 80+ magazines selecting his poetry, short stories, essays or art photography. He won the National Poetry Contest award for Writers One Flight Up. His first poetry book is ‘Journey To Become Forgotten’ (Kind of a Hurricane Press). Carl is a dedicated runner and 2nd degree black- belt.

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Remembering Snake Skeletons and a Cherry Red Impala -Artist, Finn Lafcadio O’Hanlon

Remembering Snake Skeletons and a Cherry Red Impala

On the 21st September, a second solo exhibition by 24-year-old English-born American artist, Finn Lafcadio O’Hanlon, will open at the Whiteconcepts space in Berlin. Titled The Plague Year, it will expand his meticulous exploration of syncretic religious, mediaeval and ‘pop’ iconography, cartography and lexicology – this time, within an exotic, decaying dystopia detailed in more than 25 very finely detailed monochromatic works. 
 
Finn’s last exhibition at Whitespace, two years ago, was one of the most successful openings for a young artist in Berlin that year. Introduced by the controversial German artist, Jonathan Meese, the entire show sold out within 48 hours.

Born in Brighton, England, Finn Lafcadio O’Hanlon grew up among creative, nomadic types in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Los Angeles before returning as a teenager to Sydney.

But as he recalls in the following brief memoir, it was his childhood memories of being often on the road with his eccentric parents in the American southwest that gave him a lot of the imagery that still populates his work.

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I spent my early childhood in the southwest of the United States. My mother was part-Cherokee, born and raised in Oklahoma, and my father was an Australian, but we lived for a long time in Los Angeles. We would often drive between the west coast and my mother’s family in Tulsa, but we’d take these circuitous routes on un-mapped back-roads, adding days and hundreds of miles to a journey that was already fifteen hundred miles long via the direct route on Interstate 40, through desert towns like Barstow and Winslow and Albuquerque.

 

I still remember the weird roadhouses we stopped at, filled with faux-Native American trinkets, and Mexican candied skulls, as well as petrified tree fragments, fossils and pebbles of polished turquoise. We’d end each day in some rickety, half-dead town in Arizona, New Mexico or Texas, staying in a cheap motel with a swimming pool and a noisy ice-machine. Sometimes, we’d be so close to the Mexican border that it made no difference which side of it you were on – it could just as well have been Mexico but with better air-conditioning – and at that time of the year, the whole place would be overtaken with unsettling (but to a young kid, exciting) syncretic symbols and rituals, part Catholic, part ancient Toltec, part Hopi or Navajo, with black-robed Madonnas, painted skulls and masks, crucifixes and snake skeletons. It was never scary and solemn, only celebratory, not just honouring the dead but inviting them to a party, to spend time among friends and family. The barbecue smoke always smelled of mesquite.

 

Later, when I became an artist working on large, intricate drawings in ink on paper, the impressions of those road trips insinuated themselves into what I drew: skulls on snake bodies, ’60s neon signs, tattooed women and grinning death-heads, the Robert Williams-influenced cars (my parents drove a cherry-red Chevy Impala SuperSport). Even the modern military references were derived from fleeting glimpses of fighters and tanks arrayed on open tracts of desert, at Nellis or Luke air force bases, or Camp Navajo. They seemed as commonplace as the motels, drive-in diners and cheesy girlie bars that littered our route.

Finn Lafcadio O’Hanlon-

For further information, to receive a selection of high res images, or to arrange an interview, please contact Finn by email: Flohfactory@gmail.com . His work can also be viewed in low res’ at https://www.instagram.com/finnlohanlon/

Below: Finn Lafcadio O’Hanlon, photographed in Kreuzberg by Lotti Leona, 2015
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Texas Ballet Theater is ‘On Pointe’ with Classic Combination

Texas Ballet Theater is ‘On Pointe’ with Classic Combination

(The evening show on Saturday, February 27th)

by: Kelly Fitzharris Coody

 

 

The Texas Ballet Theater, accompanied by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Michael Moricz, put on a brilliant show this weekend at the Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas. The show featured three short ballets, Allegro Brillante, The Concert (Or, the Perils of Everybody) and a stunning finale, Études.

Never have I had the experience that Texas Ballet Theater’s Classic Combination gave me on Saturday; while the dancing was impeccable and technically sound, it was so full of life and so spirited. The principal dancers and supporting dancers alike blew me away with their performances, keeping me on the edge of my seat.

“Allegro Brillante” started out the evening with principals Katelyn Clenaghan and Jiyan Dai exhibiting electric on-stage chemistry that resulted in a beautifully danced, short and oh-so-sweet 13-minute opener.

“The Concert” (choreographed by Jerome Robbins) was truly a treat. Impeccable timing and strict body control made this unique piece laugh-out-loud hilarious. Each dancer truly embodied their character while principal female Carolyn Judson nailed it over and over again with her fluidity, enthusiasm and technique.

“Études,” choreographed by Harald Lander, displayed the best dancing I’ve ever seen, hands down. Though the choreography was technically difficult, rigorous and complex, Texas Ballet Theater excelled; not once did I see a dancer physically struggle to land or to remain in fifth position while doing a grand plié in the background. In fact, the opposite happened. They danced it so beautifully that they ended up enhancing and enlivening the choreography, not the other way around. Male principals Jiyan Dai and Andre Silva danced in a way that I’ve not seen since Mikhail Baryshnikov. Like Baryshnikov before them, they made the choreography not only look effortless, but enjoyable.

Texas Ballet Theater has found a way to make classical ballet modern and relevant in a way that still maintains the integrity of the dance; which is exciting to watch. The only place I see this company going is up — and not just in their pointe shoes.

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photo credit: Steven Visneau